Welcome to the 1999 International APCO Conference at

Minneapolis, Minnesota

The state of Minnesota has many qualities that has national and international notoriety. Besides its splendor as a natural retreat, it also has a progressive reputation in education, criminal justice and human services. As a result of this proactive approach, the 9-1-1 industry realized in 1982, that due to the increasing responsibilities, knowledge and liability, that there was a need to establish a pre-entry source of future employees that would be prepared to handle the fast moving changes of this career. Managers of various sized PSAP's and related industries, collectively established a minimum skills requirement for graduates and committed their support to this new concept. This program was approved and initiatedSeptember, 1985. The first pre-entry accredited training program that established a "core" knowledge base for newly hired dispatchers. This also provided an opportunity for personnel currently in the industry to enroll in specific classes and attain the information that may have been missed during their own agency training. Additionally, the program expanded to provide certified training in those areas of mandate such as Hazardous Materials training and NCIC "Hot Files" certification. We were the first school to attain approval from the FBI to provide NCIC certification outside of a governmental agency. This provided a method for students to come to their employer with those training requirements met without having to be sent out of the building for additional certification during their departmental training time. Therefore tile training period became more productive for the new employee while complying with agency required certification. Some departments gave extra points on civil service exams because of these additional and sometimes, "elective" certificates.

There are other schools who have initiated similar programs such as Renton, Washington, Portland, Oregon, Vancouver, British Columbia, and Beaver Dam, Wisconsin to Just name a few. The hope of all of us who are responsible for our respective programs is that there would be a similar program in each state. We are willing to assist you in this process and would encourage you to contact us for any help you may need. Attached is the content of the current program at Minneapolis Community & Technical College in Minneapolis, Minnesota. I have a full syllabi for those who may need this to implement a similar program in your state. Please feel free to call, write or mail for any questions that you may have. I will be available at the conference. Ask any of the conference committee members and they can find me. Enjoy the conference.

Thank you,

Jay Johnson

Public Safety Communications: 9-1-1 Coordinator 1501 Hennepin Avenue South
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403

Phone: (612) 341-7675
Fax: (612) 359-1357
email: jjohnson@mctc.mnscu.edu

August, 1999


Minneapolis Community & Technical College

Public Safety Communications: 9-1-1 Operator/Dispatch

Certificate/Diploma Program

The communications industry, primarily that of public safety, will be making dramatic changes within the next 3 years. To meet the need and challenges of the future, the industry will be drawing on those personnel with the talents and capabilities to work in this fascinating and ever-changing career. The qualities that a potential candidate needs are

Application Process for the 9-1-1 Program

The student who has an interest in serving the community in a very rewarding career would be a potential candidate for consideration into the program. Pre-entry requirements for interested students for the 1 semester, Certificate program or the 2 semester Diploma program would have to be tested at Minneapolis Community & Technical College in the following areas PRIOR to acceptance into the program.

* Student Admissions Checklist: (9-1-1 initiative only) This will be mailed out to students once their confirmation to enroll is received at the admissions office. If you have not received it by the eighth week of the semester prior of your intended start date, call admissions at 359-1300.

The program accepts new students each semester for day classes and evening/weekend classes. The student must have all pre-requisites satisfied prior to the start of each class opening. The student must have completed the admissions process (testing, program application, etc.) before you will be placed on the list for a designated semester and year. If you have any questions regarding the industry in general or the 9-1-1 curriculum at Minneapolis Community & Technical College, please call:

Jay Johnson

Program Coordinator/Instructor
(612) 341-7675 or (800) 247-0911 ext. 7675 (Minn. only)
jjohnson@mctc.mnscu.edu


PSC 9-1-1 Certificate Curriculum

Goal: Provide curriculum content that will prepare graduates for entry level positions in the public safety industry which would include telecommunicators, radio dispatchers, and related positions in the private sector.

Prerequisites: Pass ASAP testing, demonstrate at least 30 CVVTM, interview with the program instructor (done immediately following MCTC's school orientation) and attend a pre-program field orientation at a Emergency Communications Center.

Delivery: The PSC 9-1-1 Certificate curriculum is delivered in a staggered format. This means that most courses are presented and tested in time blocks within the semester so the student will be testing out as he/she progresses through the semester. This way, the student will only have a couple of final exams to take in the final week of the semester.

Enrollment: If the student wishes to complete this program in one semester, it can be done. Required classes are scheduled Monday through Saturday in a varying format so the student may register for all classes without conflicting with other required courses.

Required Courses

Course

HLTN 1150 First Aid and CPR

PSSC 1101 Telecommunications System and Equipment Applications

PSSC 1111 911 Legal Issues

PSSC 1121 Community Resources

PSSC 1201 Emergency Communication Procedures

PSSC 1235 Problem Solving in Emergency Setting

PSSC 1215 Public Safety Answering Point

PSSC 1225 Public Safety Answering Point Lab

BTEC 1000 Fundementals of Business Computers

Total Credits Offered:

Credits

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

3

18

PSC 9-1-1 Required Courses

First Aid & CPR: The student will learn general First Aid techniques fro emergency situations. Certification my be earned in CPR and First Aid upon successful completion of the course and the recommendation of the instructor. This course meets the basic pre-requirements for Emergency Medical Dispatch training certification and more advanced Emergency Medical Service's training such as First Responder and Emergency Medical Technician.

Telecommunication System & Equipment Applications: An overview of telecommunications in public safety in their theoretical and operational format. TTY/TDD certification, and rules of NCIC/CJIS for "Hot Files" access in the CJDN.

9-1-1 Legal Issues: This course covers issues of litigation surrounding public safety and primarily of 9-1 -1. This includes Tort liability, Minnesota Data Practices Act and the court systems.

Community Resources: Overview of various agencies both private and public that a community may have in response to the publics need. Areas to be covered include, map reading, domestic abuse, crisis intervention, "SKYWARN" cold/warm basic weather, Minnesota Uniform Offense Codes and emergency management.

Problem Solving in a Emergency Setting: Focus is on building the students ability to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in their personal and professional life. Identify the dynamics of team work through group research projects and group presentation as required.

Emergency Communication Procedures: This course teaches the student to identify the roles and interaction of personnel in criminal justice, fire services and emergency medical services, focusing on the relationship between the dispatcher and the public safety industry. Integrates information from all PSC I I xx series classes.

Public Safety Answering Point: This course pulls all information from all PSSC classes and integrates it to teach the student skills in information gathering, call processing, call prioritization, and formatting radio phraseology in accordance with general industry guidelines. This is a prepatory class for PSAP Lab.

Public Safety Answering Point Lab: This course provides practical experience in the receiving and processing of public and industry-related requests utilizing basic 9-1 -1 procedures with manual record keeping procedures while developing their multiple dexterity skills in listening to the caller and radio traffic, copying information and responding to all on a Motorola Centracom Series II radio console and associated equipment in a simulated public safety setting.

Fundamentals of Business Computers: Prerequisite 25 cwpm

This course covers basic information about computer hardware and software and the use of computer software as a productivity tool. This course also covers computer architecture networking, Internet, computer crime, and database management.

PSC 9-1-1 Diploma Program

The PSC 9-1 -1 Diploma program is a two-semester program designed to provide the graduate with the additional skills to be prepared for the excitement and challenges of the 21st century.

Prerequisite: The student must demonstrate the minimum skills, during the assessment testing, prior to enrolling in English Composition 1. See your counselor.

Total number of credits required for diploma: 31

Number of required core course credits: 18 (certificate)
Number of required elective course credits: 3
Number of required general education course credits: 10

Required Core Courses

Course Title

HLTN 1150, First Aid and CPR

PSSC 1101, Telecommunication System & Equipment Applications

PSSC 1111, 9- 1 -1 Legal Issues

PSSC 1121, Community Resources

PSSC 1201, Emergency Communication Procedures

PSSC 1235, Problem Solving in Emergency Setting

PSSC 1215, Public Safety Answering Point

PSSC 1225, Public Safety Answering Point Lab

BTEC 1000, Fundamentals of Business Computers

Total Credits Offered

Credits

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

3

18

Elective Courses: Choose one

Course Title

PSSC 1301, Public Safety Communications Internship

LAWE 1250, Introduction to Corrections

SOCI 1105, Introduction to Sociology

SOCI 2155, Introduction to Criminal Justice

Total Credits Offered

Credits

3

3

3

3

3

Required General Education Courses

Course Title

SPCH 1010, Interpersonal Communications

ENGL 1110, College Composition

PSYC 110, General Psychology

Total Credits

Credits

3

3

4

10

General Education Required Courses:

Interpersonal Communications: Course focuses on the examination and acquisition of positive and effective interpersonal and interpersonal communication skills. Students examine their self-concept, relationships with others, perceptions, emotions, nonverbal communication, listening ability, conflict-resolution skills, and other aspects of interpersonal communication. Students learn and refine new communication skills through exercises in class and applications to daily life outside of class.

College Composition 1: An introduction to the elements of written language as a means of expression and communication.

Note:If a student does not have the minimum skills to be successful at the college level English courses, he/she will be required to take a developmental English course which does not apply towards program requirements.

General Psychology: This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology, its approaches to gathering and evaluating evidence about the causes and correlates of behavior, and the means by which psychological knowledge is (or can be) applied to improve the quality of life. A variety of topics including learning, memory, the brain, perception, consciousness, human development, motivation, emotion, personality, psychological disorders, and social psychology are discussed.

PSC 9-1-1 Electives:

Public Safety Communications Internship: This course allow the student to experience the day-to-day activity of a public safety agency, including rotating shifts, and gaining work experience in a live environment. The student must pass all required courses of the PSC 9-1-1 diploma program, attained an overall GPA of 3.0 or above, approval from the program coordinator, pass a criminal background check by the interning agency and/or fulfill any other processes the agency requires.

Introduction to Corrections: This is an introductory course which is designed to prove 'de students with an overview of the problems and ethical dilemmas which face America's correctional system. The institution of corrections is not only a study of our prison system, it is a myriad of complex inter-relationships among many components and institutions of society. This course will uncover the factors which influence corrections, both those who work and administer in corrections and the forces outside of the corrections industry. This incorporates the "Jailer Course" in accordance with Minnesota statute 241.02 1 and the Minnesota Department of Corrections regulation 2910. The student will be able to discuss and demonstrate the entry level skills necessary to perform the duties of a correctional officer. Administration of Medications in a correctional setting meets Minnesota Department of Corrections and the Minnesota Board of Health requirements for administration of medications for unlicensed personnel. This course also covers an overview of blood-borne Pathogens in reviewing OSHA 1910.1030 requirements of the employer.

Introduction to Sociology: This course is an introduction to the sociological perspective and method. The course attempts to sharpen a student's ability to see the centrality of culture in shaping the diversity of human experience. Topics include the study of culture, inequality, conformity and non-conformity, and social institutions like the family, education, and religion.

Introduction to Criminal Justice: This course will cover the components and dynamics of the criminal justice system, including the history of the system, sociological theories of crime, criminals, and victimization (including the roles of women and minorities), police issues (specifically minorities as peace officers and minorities as victims), and the social structure of law enforcement (e.g. courts, police, correctional institutions, etc.) The philosophical underpinnings of the criminal Justice system will also be reviewed.

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